Month: November 2018

text reflection – hito steyerl

“The poor image has been uploaded, downloaded, shared, reformatted, and reedited. It transforms quality into accessibility, exhibition value into cult value, films into clips, contemplation into distraction. [..] The contemporary hierarchy of images, however, is not only based on sharpness, but also and primarily on resolution.” Hito Steyerl Demons is an experimental film/ music video collaboration with a sound designer/ composer based in Belgium and a singer/ songwriter in Italy. The narrative concept focuses on mental illness ~ we drew inspiration from the Miss Havisham character (‘Great Expectations’) imagining her in her younger years; imagining how her story might be different if she suffered from mental illness. The concept was developed and shot in 2014/15, and while we spent the better part of 2015/16 editing the footage together, life got in the way of the project getting off the ground. Two of us had deaths in the family, which necessitated putting the project on hold for extended periods. The marketing never fully came together. The launch was again postponed until 2019, as it was intended …

site report – ryerson image centre

Read Site Report here I attended a curatorial talk at the ROM’s Africa-Asia wing as a field trip for an Anthropology course a few years ago. The talk was on an exhibit about the Berlin Conference (1884-85), its impact on museum collections, and the role museum collections played within the European colonial project. The curator was particularly passionate as this was part of her contribution to the museum, and in a small way, she felt it worked towards correcting some of the historical legacies of museum collections. The Berlin Conference was a western diplomatic effort to renew colonization efforts particularly in Africa, around fifty years after the transatlantic slave trade ended (1834 in the British colonies), when criticisms of the slave trade made public opinion a cause for concern for the new imperialist project. According to the curator, one approach was to look for ways to dehumanize Africa. Museums exhibited artifacts constructing narratives devoid of market forces, politics, any semblance of economy, religious belief, culture or civilization. Historically, museum exhibitions of these regions focused on displays …